Why RSS still matters and how to react to the impending demise of Google Reader

Google has been getting bad press about plans to retire its popular Google Reader RSS platform, in operation since 2005. Here’s my personal take and some tips on how to manage without it.

Google ignited a real storm online recently when announcing that it’s popular RSS platform, Google Reader, will be retired in July as part of a major ‘spring clean’ to enable a focus on new projects.

There’s no doubt that the user numbers on RSS  are probably in decline, due in large part to the rise in social networking and sharing sites, apps and technologies. There are so many other ways to access real time news. Yet, there is something so simple and effective about RSS and so powerful about being able to house all your feeds in one place – especially if that place happens also to log you into a range of other services including your blog, website analytics, subscription services, advertising and more.

Inspiration

I first used Google Reader around 2008, and I quickly amassed a list of over 150 site feeds I was interested in. As an agency b2b marketer, keeping on top of a range of disciplines, sectors and companies required an approach where I could quickly and easily find information in a real time way. This situation became more pressing when I started blogging, as I looked for insight and inspiration online. Google Reader is now in the first four websites I fire up every morning – alongwith Yahoo!, Hootsuite and Linkedin.

I add 4-5 new bloggers to my list every month to keep my feed fresh – as it powers my Twitter activity too. RSS is a great way to easily scan through literally hundreds of information resources in one hit.

Being able to export your RSS data and take it elsewhere might be easy but that, to me, isn’t the point. Yes, Google have given people like me four months to find something else, to export our data, and to let our subscribers know that the blog will no longer be available via Google on RSS. It’s still going to put a lot of people out.

Commercial over community?

And for what? So they can spend more time on developing products that deliver greater revenue – like prehistoric advertising products? Or commercialising Google+ perhaps, establishing paid Hangouts? Or maybe it’s about bankrolling the Google Glass concept (note: long scroll to video at bottom of page) and other prototype technologies that have a Minority Report feel to them – and a niche audience and price tag to match?

Sorry Google, you got this one wrong. This decision, even despite 100,000s of protests, is going to inconvenience everyone who uses it (many who don’t even know they do), driving people elsewhere for their news and information. As the leader in “organizing the world’s information in order to “make it universally accessible and useful”, it feels totally at odds with your mission.

Make sure you take action today. If you enjoy the latest Marketing Assassin posts via RSS, switch to the email subscription above. It’s free and quick to set up and any new content should land in your inbox around 7am GMT on the day of post.

 

Delivering a brilliant B2B website user experience

A positive and consistent user experience can make or break your business online. Does your website keep customers coming back for more?

Delivering a brilliant and compelling user experience means combining creative and functional design with speed, usability, accessibility, content architecture and contingency design.

It is important to recognise that user experience is a key part of branding. This can be simple and effective signposting like that exemplified by the Dell UK site which gets visitors to the content they want quickly. This, in turn, increases conversion rates by generating trust and encourages both loyalty from existing users and new traffic from viral referrals.

Feel the need for speed

Design with speed in mind. Slow loading pages, graphics and rich media can have a hugely negative impact on your bounce rate as visitors refuse to wait for content to load. Employ a three-click journey rule to any page within your website. Factor in simple navigation, using accepted terms and structure to make it as easy as possible for people to find what they’re looking for.

Accessibility

Web accessibility is about reaching the broadest group of people irrespective of disabilities including sight, hearing and speech; physical, cognitive and some neurological disorders.

And as technology continues to innovate at a pace, websites and other web-based applications can draw on advances in areas such as screen readers, Braille displays, magnification and voice- recognition to facilitate access to digital content. Consider them if you are specifically targeting specific groups. International standards such as W3C help set benchmarks that good web designers should abide by.

Content architecture

On large websites it can be worthwhile considering how information is grouped and collated for customer benefit. Conducting exercises offline can help identify trends in browsing behaviour and provide a useful psychological insight into how different individuals search, collate and interact with content. This can play into how the site’s navigation is designed and displayed.

The website for Swedish construction and project management company Skanska, adopts a number of simple but effective navigation techniques that help to manage the presentation of content to site users. It uses top and bottom navigation effectively deployed, as well as ‘breadcrumbs’ throughout the home page. These are additional carefully selected navigation devices that help signpost effectively to interesting content deeper in the site – namely company information, press activity, publications and upcoming events. The site also makes use of a carousel to convey key messages.

Above ‘home’ page, below ‘about us’ page.

The reality in information architecture and navigation is that people will give up quickly if they can’t find what they want, so make sure you are using industry standard definitions and not your own unique vocabulary. Use colour and tabs to help people identify where they are (side navigation bars on inner pages work well for this) and keep the clickable drill down into deeper content to no more than three levels.

Contingency design

There will always be situations where a user makes a request that the system is unable to answer or performs an action that goes against how the system was designed to work.

Leaving form fields blank, requesting a page that doesn’t exist, making a spelling mistake when performing a search or trying to buy a product that is out of stock are all examples of how users could challenge a system.

By predicting these challenges and proposing solutions to either prevent or deal with the problem – by answering the ‘what if…?’ questions – it is possible to find solutions that add value to failure and maintain a positive user experience.

Creative use of the 404 error message that typically displays when a link is broken or a page is removed from a website is a great example of predicting potential short-comings but dealing with them in a way that doesn’t unduly affect the user experience.

What other ways can you deliver brilliant user experience on your website?

Get more on B2B websites, SEO, social media and more with my new ebook Brilliant B2B Digital Marketing.

How to ensure your B2B website is “fit for function”

It is without question that websites are the most important part of your B2B digital marketing toolkit. But with much attention given over to the creative look and feel, how do you ensure the website does what is supposed to do – deliver visitors to the right content and right actions?

It is critical to consider function from the outset as this helps to prioritise elements and ensure they have the relevant profile and position within the design but not too much profile that it confuses the design. Functionality ultimately comes down to user experience – and in simple terms covers all the individual elements that need to come together to deliver that great customer experience.

There are two ways to build in function from the start of a website project.

Use wireframes to define the visual priority of main page elements

Wireframes are the best and most common way of quickly establishing which elements are required, where they should be placed and the emphasis they take on the home page. Wireframes help to build the skeleton of a website and provide a blueprint for the content and calls to action which come later. Tools like Cacoo can help to create quick wireframes for home page or landing page layouts and also support the development of full website sitemaps too.

A simple example wireframe for a business site is shown below. More expansive wireframes might include more significant calls to action such as ‘search’, email subscription, content downloads, video and social media links. And as you move deeper into the site, it is important to consider how pages may change, but retain some of the key content in top, side and bottom navigation bars.

Some marketers and designers go straight to design. Don’t. Wireframes will help provide structure to what needs to go where within a page layout for the main page types on a site.

For more on free wireframe tools, try this Mashable post.

Define primary site customer journeys

Building out your site to ensure it helps the visitors you prize the most means better understanding the primary customer journeys to your site and how they might move around it. Most likely, as a B2B website, visitors are looking for one or more of the following:

1. Find more information about a product or service.

2. Buy a product or service.

3. Find out the credibility of the supplier.

4. Check out the latest non-product information – news or offers.

5. Find contact information to make an enquiry or find a location.

6. Get customer service.

7. Register with site for alerts.

8. Connect with the brand or share information through a social network.

Developing landing pages for key campaigns and audiences is going to be critical, as is having single, compelling call to actions on each page. This is especially important when you are investing significant amounts in driving visitors to your site, for example, through pay per click or banner advertising. You’ll want to track your lead generation and ROI .

Next up: Delivering a brilliant user experience through your B2B website. Subscribe by email to make sure you don’t miss it!

Four reasons why Google+ might be THE B2B social media marketing platform

I picked the little graphic up below from the excellent Social Media B2B blog and thought it was worth sharing.

Lots of people clamoured to join and test Google+ in 2011 but it didn’t really reach the critical levels enjoyed by other breakthrough social sites.

That said, the feeling in some quarters now is that Google+ will inevitably grow to be a highly credible business marketing, networking and collaboration tool in 2013 and beyond.

If you are in any doubt, Google is behind the world’s most used search engine, as well as web advertising and website analytics and of course the highly successful Android operating system. Google has ingeniously developed Google+ functionality to have a beneficial effect on social and search optimisation. Observe your search results and you’ll see +’d content from people you may know.

And with opportunities to build specific networks (Circles) and create meaningful dialogue with them (Hangouts), it is a network that goes way beyond its competitors.

I’m thinking about using Google+ for invitation only Hangouts for clients / customers to talk about market insights, provide training or to discuss new products and service offers.

If you haven’t tried it yet, watch the demo videos here and join today. You can connect with me here.

Five ways to use creative design for a stand out B2B website

Delivering high impact creative design that has a positive impact on user interaction with your B2B website

Most of the focus in web design inevitably falls on the process that delivers the look and feel for a website. But well thought through visual branding can help to differentiate your offering and develop credibility.

Your website should be representative of your company and its design needs to efficiently and effectively convey the personality and values enshrined in other marketing material. If there is an existing brand used as part of other marketing communications, apply it to the website environment. An established brand offers an opportunity to quickly tap into design elements that customers are already comfortable with and can identify with.

Think about these five ways of developing a creative impression you can be proud of – and one that dovetails with all the other ways customers come into contact with your business.

1. Templates. For layout structure consider keeping it simple by using three main page layouts: one for the homepage, one for content pages (with different layouts for product or service categories and products in some cases) and one for form pages. For example, your homepage will have a different layout from a landing page for a PPC campaign. Keep the elements in these layouts constant. This will help keep your visitors from feeling lost.

2. Colour. Avoid using lots of colours by focusing on two to four colours consistent with your brand for your templates and call to action buttons.

3. Typography. Make sure your website type is legible and consistent with branding. Use fonts, font sizes and font colors that are easy to read. For easier page scanning, use bullet lists, section headers and short paragraphs. If your site is English language-based, make sure information flows from left to right and top to bottom.

4. Images. Images can be a powerful element to any website but you need to use them wisely. Every image is transmitting a subconscious message to your audience and sometimes the result is different from what you might expect. Many businesses use stock photography that can cheapen your brand. If you must, give stock photo shots a colour treatment makeover to develop your own style. Cropping or manipulating the angle can create a bespoke photographic style but it is always better to have your own. In all major tests, photos of real people outperformed stock photos in terms of preference.

5. Animations, gadgets and other rich media. Avoid anything unnecessary. Using Flash animations because they look cool is the wrong strategy. In most cases it’s best not to use animated background or background music. Only use rich media like video and animations to help support content and information. Carousels or sliders are becoming more common in business sites to convey proposition and promotions.

Industrial brands like Ingersoll Rand and BOC take different approaches to how the use design in their website strategy, but both are geared towards trafficking customers to content as quickly as possible.

 

 

Through combining brand colour, shape, typography, photography, graphics, sound and video, good website design can create atmosphere as well as consistency in identity. This can also help provide a framework to support the functional requirements a site needs to have as well as the content it should contain to deliver a superior customer experience.

Next up: Making websites fit for function. Subscribe by email to make sure you don’t miss it!

 

Why websites are still your most important B2B marketing tool

A recent BtoB survey indicated that websites were going to be the primary focus of B2B marketing investment and activity in 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

This doesn’t surprise me at all as websites are a company’s best way to make a first impression online. Websites are still the first resource most prospective customers draw on to filter potential suppliers, shortlist and/or validate purchasing decisions.

Think about it. When you run a search for information that is going to help you make a decision about who and where to purchase from, where do you go first?  It’s more likely to be a website for a product or service provider rather than a Facebook page or a blog.

Websites are a primary digital marketing tool because they represent home base – the point where all promotional roads should return to. We use websites to host content, sell our business, position expertise and to generate enquiries.

Customers make snap decisions; we have no time to waste online and there is abundance of choice. Don’t waste money and time on any other tools until you get a home on the web up and running, indexed and optimised.

So, when you get there, what prompts you to take your interest further or return to your search results and look elsewhere? Understanding the science of search when  it comes to B2B Internet use and applying your own search criteria to your own website will help paint a better picture of how it is working for you.

Here are five reasons why I think websites are still the most important B2B marketing tool and why they need your continued investment and attention.

1. Website as online proof of being: Your website positions and profiles your business based inherently on its content and structure. It should reflect core offer, strengths, attributes and USPs.

2. Website as an ambassador: It’s your silent salesman. A 24 hour 365 day window on the world that can operate, provide information, collect data and gather leads even when you’re sleeping.

3. Website as a content hub: Having one place where you systematically build a platform of expertise works for customers and improves your SEO ranking and visibility.

4. Website as a driver for opt in communications: Content developed for news, blog, download or landing pages makes newsletters and eshots much easier to craft.

5. Website as a store: Even in B2B there are opportunities to create transactional relationships on your website. This might come in simple documentation, event ticketing form or actually selling product.

In upcoming posts, I’m looking at the processes and critical successful factors that lead to effective B2B websites.

 

 

Setting B2B digital marketing objectives

Objectives means ‘where do we want to be?’

Most marketing professionals know that objectives that are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Timed (SMART) provide a pathway to marketing success. How often, though, do you take the time to set a specific plan for the use of the array of digital channels?

SMART digital marketing objectives help select which tools and techniques are best suited to deliver against the strategy you have elected to follow.

Digital marketing offers superb analytical capability but this doesn’t mean much if you don’t have some firm objectives from the outset. This means taking a realistic benchmark of what you have and what you can achieve, and creating some goals on which to base a future evaluation. In this post, I’ll take you through five areas of objective setting we’ve set out in Brilliant B2B Digital Marketing – available now in ebook format from Amazon.

Setting the Five Ss goals

The Five Ss of digital marketing (credit to Smith & Chaffey) is a useful way to start sense-checking your digital marketing planning. The Five Ss are used here as a simple mnemonic for a range of objectives that might be considered.

1. Sell – Have we set goals to grow sales?

Start with goals for your most important transactions which will lead to revenue and profit! That’s sales, or if you don’t sell online, the leads that your online marketing will deliver, which will convert through to sales or donations if you’re a not-for-profit.

For most B2B companies, the sale will come much further down the line but it remains important to set some sales-related goals within your digital marketing planning. Are you able to qualify for example the average order quantity or value based on minimum order, pack size or price? Using Google Analytics you can begin to track clickthroughs to requests for information, telephone calls, face-to-face appointments, demonstrations and free trials.

What about considering ways to increase sales and looking at scenario planning to increase sales by category, by region, by key client or sub-sector? Looking at your pipeline of business prospects, there are also opportunities to increase sales through increasing the efficiency of customer journeys on your website.

2. Speak – Have we set goals to get closer to customers?

Digital channels are not only sales channels, they excel as communications channels to engage your audience. We say engage because it isn’t about one-way broadcasting; good marketing requires you to get the balance right between communicating your offer and interacting with your audience.

Encouraging email subscribers to sign up is a staple ingredient of a successful digital B2B plan as the resulting email newsletter and eshots can provide excellent feedback on how your communication is being received and interacted with. Most email services will help you gauge who opens when and how many times, who clicks through and if they forward to colleagues. It is also good for data cleansing as bad, gone away and unsubscribes can be routinely managed.

For social media, tools are available for buzz monitoring and sentiment analysis. These will show you where you are being talked about and whether the conversations are positive, negative or neutral – also relevant to these goals.

And, since digital channels work best when joined with other channels, the goals here should also include online visits prompted by traditional offline media.

Make sure every page of a website or blog and every email and placed article includes a call to action that is a click to another page, further reading, more information, a sign-up or download.

3. Serve – Have we set goals to online customer service goals?

Most customers visit websites for information relating to orders, help with products or services, or to make comments or complaints. Visitors need to be quickly directed to contact us and frequently asked questions (FAQs) pages as standard, so why not set goals for customer care, service and satisfaction too?

Often this is an area most companies are notoriously poor at, but it might just be the focus of your unique online proposition to pay greater attention to enquiries of this type and offer a supremely speedy service which marks this out as a true value add. Live Talk and other on-page help functions are making a comeback to websites as companies look to differentiate and keep customers for the long term.

Providing excellent end-to-end service online also has a positive knock-on effect to your capability to effectively Sell, Speak, Save and Sizzle.

4. Save – Have we set cost-saving goals?

Saving money, time and effort is a less glamorous goal than some of the others, but you can also show the value you gain through using online cost savings to reduce service costs and save on traditional media like print and post.

This is most relevant for B2B service companies, especially those with multiple site operations where efficiency in operations can be achieved. Marketers can set goals for the number of catalogues downloaded or number of service transactions compared with other channels. In extreme cases, it may help unearth underperforming branches and identify logistical supply issues that are costing money and losing sales.

If you are fighting for budget for online channels, the savings you can demonstrate to your finance director or budget holder through digital means will support your argument.

5. Sizzle – Are we adding value to our brand online?

Putting the sizzle into your digital marketing will really help achieve your sales and speak goals, but it’s not very easy to set goals for elements like brand advocacy and engagement and then try to track them.

Sizzle is about building your brand online. Think about what makes for a positive online brand experience for your target audience and you. Remember that most business buyers are looking for information that is going to inform a short listing or purchase process – and reassurance they are making the right decision.

We have already said it’s important to set goals and track the quality of the experience online, but you should also check the temperature of your sizzle through how shareable and likeable your brand is.

If the experience is effective, the benefits of engaging with your digital presence will be clear; the interactions within the site and with other channels will be smooth and the visitor will want to use your online services again, and tell their friends and colleagues about it.

So, key measures on sizzle need to be set around elements such as sentiment and more specifically levels of satisfaction, service, recommendations and advocacy.

Think about how the Five Ss help to determine what those SMART objectives need to concentrate on. Your goals for marketing your B2B products and services digitally marketing should support, and be supported by, your wider marketing strategies.

Image credit: Laurie Gough

Are large B2B companies any better at digital marketing?

A blog post this week looking at how the top 500 Fortune B2B companies approach digital marketing made for interesting reading.

Featured on Clickz.com Matthew Sweezey’s research painted a detailed picture of poor execution when it comes to critical areas like data capture, conversion and follow up. Only 25% of companies were routinely using forms within their content to stimulate engagement and discussion, most used forms for general conversion but asked way too many unnecessary questions creating a barrier to conversion. And, only 55% followed up a web based enquiry within 48 hours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most of us don’t work for Fortune 500 or FTSE 100 companies. But this data is relevant because it highlights the golden opportunity for us in smaller enterprises, and how a little technical know-how and application could go a long way in improving outbound marketing, lead generation, conversion and customer service.

As most of us are not the leader in our chosen field, we have to be nimble and agile to take advantage of opportunities that come our way. It’s encouraging that larger companies, it seems, are not always so responsive and attentive to customer needs.

Perhaps you can see one or two things in this that you can use to your benefit as you market yourself, your business, your products and services over the coming months. It’s certainly given me something to ponder on.

Do you work for a large company? Is the digital marketing better/worse/easier/harder?

 

Selling B2B digital marketing to the C-suite

Need to get buy in to resource and investment in digital marketing? Keep reading to learn five ways to get the investment you need.

 

Whether it is ‘intangibles’ like up front strategy, planning and goal setting or ‘tangibles’ like websites, blogs, email systems, databases, social media accounts and more, you need to be able to bring your colleagues with you.

Arguing the case for an investment in digital marketing involves an understanding of the rules and vocabulary of the boardroom.

You have a digital footprint

Everything you and your business does online helps create a digital footprint which has immediate and far-reaching implications on your brand. Customers can make a spontaneous first impression of your capability and credibility so it is important to get it right. With some customers the impression made, the quality of presentation and substance of the content are so fundamental that poor first impressions rule you out for life.

The ability to track and trace

Encouragingly, digital marketing can be tracked in much more thorough ways than other more traditional techniques. An investment in overt migration of traffic towards websites, landing pages and other content hubs is a smart move and getting a view of impressions, clicks and visits helps to establish what works, what is valued and what is not. With the advent of the download, customers are now prepared to exchange contact data in exchange for worthwhile content that will aid their understanding of a given topic or help them in their role.

So, is it any wonder that if you don’t have a strategy that illustrates where you are, where you want to be and how you are going to get there, then when you ask for investment, senior managers appear reluctant?

The benefits of a digital strategy for a business are straight forward and clear:

  • It can deliver immediate, measurable return on investment.
  • It provides a consistent platform for brand communications and amplification in the most important, growing and innovating area of modern business.

Five things to remember when convincing senior and financial management about digital investment

1. Remember, they need your expertise

It’s not that the boardroom is hostile to the concept of digital marketing. A lack of confidence and lack of knowledge probably makes your board nervous. From their kids spending all their time on Facebook, to complicated smartphones to the rise of app culture, the value to B2B isn’t always easy to draw.

It’s your responsibility to bring them up to speed and always make recommendations with the company’s best interests at heart. Simple quick wins might involve internal training, shadowing on projects and visits to conferences and exhibitions to immerse in the industry. This will help you understand issues, trends and fuel strategic thinking.

2. Understand the language of finance

Those empowered with rubber-stamping business investment are invariably concerned about risk, return, cost and savings. With accountancy at their core, their perspective is the removal of excess expense. Consequently, unsubstantiated trends and crazes, new platforms – anything without a reasoned and robust strategy behind them – are not going to get financial backing.

3. Make attribution your friend

Marketing is all too often viewed as an extravagant overhead in many companies and is constantly under scrutiny. Finance Directors can be uncomfortable with marketing campaigns that cannot be measured, partly because of the rather mystical approach to attribution and the squabble that often takes place between marketing and sales teams.

But explaining the principles of media attribution models and the move away from ‘last click wins’ models can really help foster an understanding and buy-in to digital marketing expenditure. It can also help you explain the value of activities which are likely to be more effective in brand building and demand generation than traditional approaches.

4. Paint a picture of an improved future

Or so you might think. Try to build a compelling argument that makes the case for investment in marketing activity based on generating leads (risk), reports greater visibility of results (return), automating previously manual tasks (cost), delivers service at a reduced cost (save). It doesn’t have to be immediate – future time and resource cost savings are as powerful as real time ones.

5. Paint a picture of a future without it

Demonstrate, especially drawing on big industry trends and the activities of your primary competitors how not investing will actually have a devastating effect on the long term profitability of the business.

What challenges do you face in requesting (more) digital marketing investment? Share your challenges and tips below.

 

 

Download the new 440 page Brilliant B2B Digital Marketing eBook from Amazon today – for Kindle and Kindle apps for all devices and computers. 

 

Image credit: Telegraph blog

Ten reasons your B2B digital marketing probably isn’t doing what it should

Unfocused marketing activity generally leads to unsatisfactory results. This is magnified online where it is very easy to pour time and effort into tools that promise much but fail to deliver.

If you are marketing products and services to other businesses, return on investment is critical. If you aren’t thinking strategically you are wasting company time, effort and resource and not only harming the prospects of the business but also your own career prospects too.

Here are some common problems and ways to overcome them.

1. You’re directionless. Companies without a digital strategy don’t have clear strategic goals for what they want to achieve online in terms of gaining new customers or building deeper relationships with existing ones. Setting goals provides direction, makes it possible to decide on the best digital tools to use to support your business and sets a benchmark for evaluation.

2. You don’t have a powerful offer. A clearly defined Online Value Proposition (thanks Dave Chaffey) will help you differentiate your online service encouraging prospects and existing customers to engage initially and stay loyal.

3. You don’t know your online customers well enough. Google Analytics will help with volumes but won’t tell you how they think or what they want. You need to use other forms of feedback to identify customer need in order to optimally meet them.

4. You don’t know your online market share. Customer demand for online services may be underestimated if you haven’t researched this. This will make it difficult to know how you’re competing. Requirements online will be different from traditional channels with different types of customer profile and behaviour, competitors, propositions and options for marketing communications.

5. You’re not integrated, you’re ‘disintegrated!’ It’s all too common for digital to be placed in a silo whether that’s a specialist digital marketer, sitting in IT or a separate digital agency. Failing to integrate with other marketing activity is a missed opportunity and something you should work urgently to address.

6. You don’t have enough people/budget. Insufficient resource will be devoted to both planning and executing digital marketing activities and there is likely to be a lack of specific specialist skills, which will make it difficult to respond to competitive threats effectively.

7. You’re wasting the people, time and money you do have. Even if you do have sufficient resource it may be not deployed optimally. This is particularly the case in larger companies where you see different parts of the marketing organisation purchasing different tools or using different agencies for performing similar online marketing tasks.

8. You’re not optimising. Hopefully every marketer managing a business website employs Google Analytics. What is often missing is the reporting to senior management. An agreed strategy places a focus on the basics, which include goals that allow progress to continuous improvement of the key aspects like search marketing, site user experience, email and social media marketing.

9. You’re not agile enough to catch up or stay ahead. If you look at top online business brands like Blackberry, Dell, FedEx, Norton, Siemens as well as more consumer focused brands like Amazon, Tesco and Zappos, they are all dynamic – trialing new approaches to keep and/or gain online audiences.

10. More nimble existing and start-up competitors are likely to gain market share. If you’re not devoting enough resources to digital marketing or you’re using an ad hoc approach with no clearly defined strategies, you will lose out to your competitors.

Q: What other challenges do you face as a B2B marketer tasked with digital marketing?