New talk: Bootcamp – The role of PR in digital marketing, 5th November (Manchester)

PR & blogging

Join me on the 5th November at Manchester Metropolitan University Business School, (All Saints Campus, Oxford Road) as I deliver some new content aimed at closing up the gap between PR and digital marketing. 

Session details:

The huge focus on social media marketing may have overshadowed the key principles and best practice of PR as a discipline. In this bootcamp we review the critical role of traditional PR techniques in the digital marketing context with leading exponents of the art of PR in digital marketing. Learning key tips, advice and best practice to apply in your own role with the author of Brilliant B2B Digital Marketing and some special guests.

The session will cover:

• Managing a crisis online
• How to measure and evaluate your PR activity
• Is conventional media still relevant in the social media age?
• How to make your organisation’s blog more effective, drive more traffic to it, and make it work from an SEO point of view

 

Registration is from 09:00; the event starts at 09:30 and finishes at 13:30. Click here for more information and booking details.

Is the old agency model dead?

A question posed in PRWeek this week as agency GolinHarris took over the publication with several pages given over to analysis of their new agency structure.

Much was made of their decision to demolish the traditional structure and replace accepted roles with a four pillared approach based on strategist, creator, catalyst and connector specialists instead of generalists.

But is it a clever PR stunt or something deeper? A comment perhaps on the evolving demands placed on the consultancy sector or the often bloated nature of the agencies that work within it and their need to drive efficiency?

Whichever side you come down on,  it provoked lots  of industry heavyweights, and some lightweights too, into offering their perspective.

What their move has done is recognise the growing role and significance of digital and social media in the marketing mix. And it gives a mid-sized PR agency the opportunity the take on specialist PR, advertising, media and digital agencies in an increasingly divergent operating environment.

Scale is a factor and this is the reason most agencies are structured the way the are. Clients invariably prefer a single point of contact as this reduces the communications flow to a more manageable level. It will be interesting to see if other agencies follow suit.

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Top Tweets of the Week we 10 Dec 2010

Hope you’ve had a great week. Here are a few things that inspired, educated, informed and entertained me this week.

Mon – Incredible: RT @jeffbullas: 90 Tips To Make Your Blog Rock http://bit.ly/hfuq2x

Mon – 15 of the lamest Google Ads ever http://t.co/pzRAzx4 via @Econsultancy

Tues – RT @TomPick How to Make PR and Social Media Work Together | Webbiquity | B2B Marketing Blog http://bit.ly/eTxVn7

Weds – Why Klout doesn’t count: putting social media influence in context http://t.co/Lm5988b via @Econsultancy

Fri -What’s the next big idea in B2B? http://t.co/TrACPzv via @MLTCreative

And finally, purely for comedy value, check out this dopey arsenist who gets outmanoeuvred by a lampost fleeing the scene of the crime http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-11942814

Have a great weekend! RP

Marketing Metrics 5: Speaking up

If you have something interesting to say, or are an interesting, engaging speaker, it’s worth considering public speaking as an element of your marketing strategy.  Speaking at conferences can be a powerful way of building a profile and raising the awareness of your skill set and expertise to your target audience.

Whether you opt to start small by acting as a guest speaker at a local networking or business group, running your own industry specific seminars or headline a major industry conference with a keynote presentation or panel place, one thing is certain. Everyone remembers a great speaker and a great presentation, and often business can be won off the back of one.

Speaker opportunities have long been highly prized within the PR fraternity as a way of pushing clients up the scale of influence. How do you think those experts who always seem to be the ones talking at the major conferences and being quoted in the trade or consumer press get there? By hard work and through building strong relationships with the media who run publications and organize conferences.

As the scale of opportunities afforded by technology and the Internet broaden, it is ever more important to specialise and avoid being seen as a generalist. There is a niche in every line of business and aligning your speaking engagements to 1/ your target audience and 2/ your specialist subject areas are fast tracks to expert status.

The ability to host webinars and webcast live on the Internet using sites like Bright Talk and Event Brite, to create podcasts for uploading to sites like iTunes and create and share presentations and video using sites like You Tube, Vimeo and SlideShare have revolutionised the concept of the expert and brought it to the masses.

But how do you measure the return from time spent?

It’s surprisingly easy. In most offline and online cases, the delegate list will be captured, especially if the carrot of exclusive post event material is dangled. An opportunity to join an exclusive group or register for exclusive content is always enticing. And remember this means all these contacts are themselves opting in.

Superficial statistics like the number of delegates, requests for and downloads of information are to a degree useful, but ultimately you should be forging a measurable link between the time and cost of preparing and giving the presentation and any tangible business outcomes, like opportunities to meet, opportunities to provide a proposal or quote and the landing of business.

Using speaking opportunities at seminars, conferences and exhibitions is a long term strategy designed to build profile and elevate you as an expert in your field. It is a tool that naturally sits on the fluffier side of the return on investment equation (unless you are able to charge for attendance in which case it is a revenue spinner all on its own).

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